15 Great Movie Friendships Of 2019

NOTE: This list only has films that I have seen in 2019. Apologies if a particular film isn’t on this list.

Instead of writing a review, I thought of doing something a little different this time. So, today I’d like to celebrate friendship and showcase some of the best from the year gone by. The following list is in chronological order. Let’s begin

Billi & Nai Nai – The Farewell

Lulu Wang’s touching portrayal of a family dealing with illness finds its soul in these two.

Jimmie & Montgomery – The Last Black Man In San Francisco

A story about identity finds itself held together with two different kinds of people who nonetheless care for each other.

Michael & Andy – Paddleton

This low-key film shows us that true friendships sometimes means just being there for the other person.

The Brothers – Kumbalangi Nights

They might be at each other’s throats but when the time comes, they’ll have the other person’s back.

MC Sher & Murad – Gully Boy

There is a strong case for having Moeen and Murad here but MC Sher’s guidance and friendship is what transforms Murad into Gully Boy.

Zak & Tyler – The Peanut Butter Falcon

This is simply one of the sweetest friendships I’ve seen in a long time, it is the definition of feel-good.

Amy & Molly – Booksmart

A hilarious coming-of-age film that beautifully showcases the bond between these two and gives us memorable moments to boot.

The Bean Bag Boys – Good Boys

This is pretty much Superbad for a new generation but the adventures these three get to, is going to be the among the funniest you have seen in a long time.

Rick & Cliff – Once Upon A Time In Hollywood…

Rick Dalton’s career may be going up and down but he’ll always Cliff Booth by his side.

Ephraim & Thomas – The Lighthouse

Through the film, they move away from being friends but for a brief period, they are the merriest of buddies and that is a joy to behold.

Carroll & Ken – Ford v. Ferrari

The two men push each other to reach greater heights giving us some exhilarating and touching moments.

Losers Gang – Chhichhore

The losers teach us a valuable lesson that life is not just about winning, there is more to it.

Destiny & Ramona – Hustlers

From being a mentor to a friend, these two go through the whole roller-coaster of emotions and take us along for the ride.

Frank & Jimmy – The Irishman

This has to be the most unexpectedly touching friendship from last year as we see these men grow from strangers to BFFs.

Schofield & Blake – 1917

When it comes to friendship we do certain things even if they do not make sense, we just do them because we care.

Until next time, bye.

The Irishman – Crafting An Epic

WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD

Before I get into how I feel about The Irishman I’d just like to say that it is kind of a miracle that this film actually got made. Thanks to Netflix for picking it up and letting Marty create the magic that he always does. So, let’s get back to the film at hand. The Irishman is different from a film like GoodFellas particularly in it’s pacing. While the 1990 film was more about the speed at which the mob goes, this is more of a methodical approach. The result is that we get to see all elements of the mob, the government and most importantly the men.

This is more to do with how these men deal with what what they’ve done. The most obvious example of this is Frank Sheeran (Robert de Niro) and the final shot says so much about him. It ends up being a little heartbreaking to see a man at the brink. The Irishman is backed up by what you expect from a film that has this much firepower. From the performances that frequently feel sublime and the direction that knows when to reveal and when to hold back. A special mention has to be made about Rodrigo Prieto’s camera that captures all the chaos with such elegance that it feels intoxicating.

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And of course, you can’t talk about The Irishman without the heavyweights that are involved. De Niro, Pacino and Pesci all pull off their best work in years and they’re not really playing to type here. Pesci’s Russell is in many ways the anti Tommy from GoodFellas. You don’t expect him to be this way but it is a revelation to see him introspect so much while being a complete badass. De Niro does explode every now and then but by the end of the film, there is almost a sense of guilt and regret in his mind. Pacino on the other hand gets the most showy part of the film and is in incredible form. When you have so many people operating at their peak, the results are going to be magical.

These three are supported by some fine turns including Harvey Keitel, Ray Romano and Anna Paquin who in a nearly wordless performance says so much about Frank the man. The Irishman is more than just a story about the mob. It is about betraying friends, losing family and all the while looking to survive. The jobs these men do takes a lot out of them and it is visible both physically and literally. Using digital effects to show the age of these men will feel a little distracting to begin with. But due to the power of talent on display, you will soon forget that and be invested in the story. I’d never thought I would get to see a somber mob film from Marty but I’m so happy that he’s entered that zone. More than anything else, The Irishman is proof that there are very few directors who can stage a scene as well as Scorsese does. From all of us, thank you for The Irishman. Keep making more movies and bringing such amazing talents together. Also, thank you Netflix.

Until next time, bye.